TASC Test Information For

Colleges/Postsecondary Schools


Get the Facts

Fast Facts for College Admissions Directors on the New HSE Tests


January 2014 marked the retirement of the 2002 version of the GED® test. With this change, colleges like yours may be seeing test results from new, unfamiliar high school equivalency (HSE) tests like TASC test . We at Data Recognition Corporation | CTB realize that you may need time to better understand what these new HSE test scores mean and how examinees that earn these new HSE credentials will perform in your college’s programs.

Moreover, as a college admissions professional, you may be interested in knowing which states have adopted new HSE assessments, and the national recognition these tests have received. To that point, earlier this year the United States Department of Education (DOE) acknowledged the validity of diplomas awarded by states that have authorized the use of new HSE tests, thereby recognizing all HSE credentials to be of equal merit.

So what do you need to know about new HSE tests?


• Some new tests like the TASC test offer examinees the possibility of earning either a high school equivalency or honors-level designation. Those that take the TASC test and earn an honors-level credential have demonstrated the ability to succeed in college courses without the need to enroll in developmental education classes.

• The TASC test offers all new content and is aligned to the College and Career Readiness Standards defined by the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education (OCTAE). Test items are contextualized to real world situations so applied learning is required. Visit www.tasctest.com/item-types-for-educators.html to learn more about TASC test content.

• Technology-enhanced items on the TASC test require critical thinking and problem-solving skills. These same skills are essential for success in postsecondary programs and by employers.

• Evidence-based writing assignments demonstrate the ability of test takers to formulate hypotheses and identify sources to substantiate claims with concrete, well-defined facts—a valuable skill in college and on the job.


2014 Statistical Summary Report